Welcome to Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 1,000 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Statin Intolerance

Statin Intolerance Research Study


We are seeking volunteers for a research study to evaluate an investigational medication for individuals unable to take medications called statins without side effects. 

You may be eligible if:

  • You are at least 18 years old
  • You are statin intolerant  

There are additional study requirements to qualify for participation.

Participants who qualify will receive study related medication and medical exams at no cost. Qualified participants will receive compensation for time and travel.  

For more information call:
(904)730-0166


**If this study doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **

Memory Screening

Why Did I Walk In This Room?

How often do we find ourselves asking this frustrating question?  First, we begin to worry that there may be something going on with our memory.  Then, we wonder who can help us. This is what motivated JCCR’s CEO, Michael Koren, M.D. to begin the process of developing our Memory Program. The program was designed to offer people 50 years old or older an opportunity to be evaluated and tested in a comfortable, private setting.
The visit involves an assessment of your medical history and medications, discussing any concerns, and a verbal memory test.  If you are interested in a confidential memory screening, please call our Jacksonville office (JCCR) at 730-0166. Come in and let us put your mind at ease.
 Or sign up below!
 

**If this program doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **





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Our Staff

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Joyce Williams

If you have ever stepped foot into the Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research building on University Blvd. then you have probably met Joyce M. Williams. Joyce has been the “Director of First Impressions” here since March 2, 1998, and she became the first African American shareholder at JCCR in 2003.

Joyce is an ordained minister! She attended Jacksonville Theological Seminary and graduated in May 2007 with an Associate’s Degree in Religious Arts of Biblical Studies. She is very involved in her church; she is the Lead Vocalist, #1 Choir Director, Church Secretary, President of the Missionary Board, and Deaconess.

If all of this doesn't keep Joyce busy enough, she also collects thimbles - she has over one hundred! She also loves to color large coloring pads and books. Some of Joyce’s favorite foods are spaghetti, fried chicken and seafood. If you have met Joyce, you can agree that she has a great love for her job and all the people that she meets. 

Julie Baker

Julie Baker - Registered Nurse and a Clinical Research Coordinator at Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research (JCCR).

My husband was transferred to Jacksonville in 1993, at the same time our CEO Dr. Koren happened to be looking for a research nurse.  We moved from Pensacola, where I had worked for physicians for 10 years.  My favorite part of that job was coordinating clinical research.  So I was excited to have the chance to do research fulltime in Jacksonville.  Little did I know that I had found the best job in Jacksonville!  I was the first person hired fulltime for Dr. Koren’s research team.  It has been a privilege to be a part of the growth of JCCR, doing such important work with such great people! 

I’ve been married to my die hard Cubs fan for 40 years, and we still are each other’s favorite person to be with!  We both love exploring new places, especially our wonderful National Parks.   We are known for planning our travels a year or more in advance! 

After living near the Gulf Coast for 13 years, and in Jacksonville for 24 years, we are spoiled by our fabulous seafood.  We considered moving to the mountains when we retire, but would miss the seafood too much.  So we found our forever house in Jacksonville.  We decided Jacksonville is a great home base, and we can travel anywhere from here.

As a nurse, patient education and safety have always been important to me.  Since JCCR shares the same values, this career has been a terrific fit for me for 24 years. 

Alex Hill

Since Spring of 2013, Alex has been a wonderful addition to our research family. He has been a Research Assistant at two Encore Research sites; starting at Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research and currently at Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research (University Blvd).

Alex is a man of many hobbies, some of which include: plant breeding "Nepeta cataria citriodora" (Citrus Cat Nip), lampworking, bead making, cycling, and gardening. In fact, Alex's garden is called Eir and is registered with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and he has formed an LLC (Limited Liability Company) named Lyfberg which is Icelandic for "Healing Hill" which will take his gardening hobby to a professional level.

When Alex is not busy with all of those hobbies, he may be seen collecting heirloom seeds, millefiori glass (Italian for "thousand flowers"), or pokemon cards. His favorite food is a cheeseburger, even a veggie burger, and he is currently working on a recipe for a veggie burger with mostly beans, seeds, and rice.

If you noticed Alex's photo, you might have guessed that his favorite football team is the Jaguars. He also enjoys The Flash comic and TV show. His favorite video game is Halo and card game is pokemon (Gotta Catch 'Em All!) 

Lastest Blog Post:


Over 50? Here Is Why You Should Be Concerned About Deadly Diarrhea and C. Diff!

Ask anyone who has had a Clostridium difficile (C. difficile, or C. diff) infection and they will probably tell you that it was one of the worst experiences of their life. Imagine the worst flu you’ve ever had but on steroids! C. diff is affectionately referred to as “deadly diarrhea” and with symptoms such as watery diarrhea 10 to 15 times a day that’s no joke! It can also come with a multitude of other symptoms such as: severe abdominal pain/cramping, rapid heart rate, fever, blood or pus in the stool, nausea, dehydration, and kidney failure.

 

What is C. Diff?

C. diff is one of the many different types of bacteria that lives in our intestines. It may sound gross but bacteria in your intestines are completely normal and you need a good balance of them to remain healthy. When something such as antibiotic use throws off the balance in your intestines C. diff may start to grow out of control and begin release toxins that attack the lining of the intestines which leads to that deadly diarrhea.

Is C. Diff contagious?

C. diff is contagious, so even if you were not recently on antibiotics, you can still catch C. diff by contact with a contaminated surface. Spores from C. diff bacteria come from human feces, soil, water and animal feces. These spores can also live for weeks or months outside the body.

Who is at risk?

C. diff is most often associated with doctor or healthcare facility visits or recent antibiotic use. There is a higher risk for adults ages 50 and over, especially those that have frequent doctor visits or have had any type of recent surgery or a hospitalization.

What can you do to lower your risk?

Good handwashing practices, especially after doctor or healthcare facility visits are a great start to lowering your risk of getting a C. diff infection. Another way is to take probiotics daily anytime you take an antibiotic. The reason for this is because when you take an antibiotic it not only kills off the bad bacteria, but it also kills off the good bacteria, giving C. diff a chance to thrive. Taking a probiotic, even if it’s just store bought yogurt, helps feed and rebalance your good gut bacteria. These are not fool proof, but they may help.

A Vaccine to prevent C. Diff?

While Handwashing and probiotics are certainly a must, researchers agree they are still not enough when it comes to preventing this life-threatening infection. Which is why we are involved in a cutting-edge research study working on the development of a new vaccine for C. diff prevention. If you are interested in volunteering, this study is for people ages 50 and up who have been recently hospitalized, have an upcoming surgery, or have frequent healthcare contact. If you are not sure if you qualify, please give our office a call or sign up here and we will be glad to answer any questions!

Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research

904-621-0390


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