Welcome to Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 1,000 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.                        

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Statin Intolerance

Statin Intolerance Research


If you are statin intolerant and would like to receive more information, call or sign up below. Book your free evaluation today!

 
(904)730-0166


**If this study doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **

Memory Screening

Why Did I Walk In This Room?

How often do we find ourselves asking this frustrating question?  First, we begin to worry that there may be something going on with our memory.  Then, we wonder who can help us. This is what motivated JCCR’s CEO, Michael Koren, M.D. to begin the process of developing our Memory Program. The program was designed to offer people 50 years old or older an opportunity to be evaluated and tested in a comfortable, private setting.
The visit involves an assessment of your medical history and medications, discussing any concerns, and a verbal memory test.  If you are interested in a confidential memory screening, please call our Jacksonville office (JCCR) at 730-0166. Come in and let us put your mind at ease.
 Or sign up below!
 

**If this program doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **





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Our Staff

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Amanda Elwood

At Encore Research Group we have many employees who work behind the scenes and never get to meet patients. Amanda Elwood is a prime example, as she is a Regulatory Specialist at our Jacksonville office handling regulatory compliance and lots of the paperwork it takes to get new studies started. She has been with us for two years now.

To say Amanda loves animals is an understatement, since she has three dogs and four cats. We have to agree with her when she says “It’s a lot of work, but the snuggling makes it worth it!”

Amanda was born in Puerto Rico and she loves Hispanic foods! Some of her favorites are tostones, empanadillas and picadillo.

She is obsessed with The Walking Dead and Game of Thrones. She also collects postcards from all of the places she visits. She spent a summer studying abroad and collected postcards from Switzerland, Amsterdam, France, and Italy.

Joy Viau

I do my part for the Encore Research community by doing what I can every day to make the Encore site family the best research network in the country. As chief financial officer, I manage the Encore treasury and provide support to all the “villagers” in our corporate community. 

I grew up in rural Virginia and married a sailor. After 17 moves in 30 years, we settled our family here in Jacksonville. I went to eight different universities during our many Navy duty stations and finally graduated from the University of North Florida. I have two beautiful daughters and a wonderful dance partner who loves to travel as much as I do. I also love dancing, creating paper art, reading, listening to music, and hiking anywhere. My favorite sports teams are the Jacksonville Suns, the Jacksonville Jaguars and the Washington Redskins. I’ve rarely met a food I didn’t like.

Joyce Williams

If you have ever stepped foot into the Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research building on University Blvd. then you have probably met Joyce M. Williams. Joyce has been the “Director of First Impressions” here since March 2, 1998, and she became the first African American shareholder at JCCR in 2003.

Joyce is an ordained minister! She attended Jacksonville Theological Seminary and graduated in May 2007 with an Associate’s Degree in Religious Arts of Biblical Studies. She is very involved in her church; she is the Lead Vocalist, #1 Choir Director, Church Secretary, President of the Missionary Board, and Deaconess.

If all of this doesn't keep Joyce busy enough, she also collects thimbles - she has over one hundred! She also loves to color large coloring pads and books. Some of Joyce’s favorite foods are spaghetti, fried chicken and seafood. If you have met Joyce, you can agree that she has a great love for her job and all the people that she meets. 

Lastest Blog Post:


4 Major Developments In Vaccine Research

Written by: Dr. Jeff Jacqmein

As we are beginning to prepare for vaccine season here at ENCORE Research now is a great time to inform you of some of the recent advancements in the field. There are many vaccines in the pipeline (http://www.who.int/immunization/diseases/en/) and with volunteers like you we look forward to helping bring them to market.  I have selected four major developments to share with you that demonstrate how the field is evolving and the technology is improving.

Recently there has been major concern worldwide about the spread of Zika virus, which is especially worrisome to pregnant patients. The National Institutes of Health is using a piece of DNA with genes that code for Zika, but are not infective to create a new vaccine. When the vaccine is injected into the arm muscle, the body reads the genes and creates virus-like particles which the body then thinks is an infection and then mounts a complete and lasting immune response. However, this is not the only way DNA is being used in vaccine creation.

DNA cloning has transformed the vaccine development process to shorten the average vaccine approval time while increasing safety. Previously, vaccine approval took 10-15 years to progress from laboratory development to clinical trials.  Researchers can now genetically engineer cows or rabbits with human DNA to gather more accurate information on safety, efficacy and potency of vaccines in pre-clinical trials.  This is important because it results in a safer and more effective product reaching patients in clinical trials sooner. 

Pertaining to vaccine efficacy is the third advancement I would like to share with you, which is development of new vaccine adjuvants.  Adjuvants are added to a vaccine to help the recipient create a stronger and longer-lasting immune response. According to a recent article in Immune Network, there are six new classes of vaccine adjuvants in clinical development. These developments are critically important because although recent vaccines are safer, they tend to provoke a weaker immune response when compared to past inoculations for smallpox and polio. An example of this is many older people requiring a Herpes Zoster booster vaccine to prevent shingles. 

Lastly, is the invention of Nanopatch technology.  Historically, vaccines needed to be stored frozen or refrigerated until just prior to dosing. This requirement significantly limited vaccine distribution, especially in remote locations. Nanopatch technology, does not have the same temperature requirement making it more practical for helping end diseases in countries where refrigeration is not readily available. The skin vaccination patch contains thousands of vaccine-coated microprojections that penetrate the skin and deliver the vaccine into localized immune cells.  This technology could revolutionize the field!

Although we have more tools than ever, clinical scientific progress would be stunted without you, our volunteers. While it may be in self-interest to enroll in a vaccine trial aimed at keeping your cancer in remission (http://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-making-serious-progress-on-a-universal-cancer-vaccine), it is an act of service to your fellow man to dedicate yourself to a typical vaccine clinical trial. Because of you, we helped to bring the meningitis B vaccine to market within two years of major college campus outbreaks (http://www.nmaus.org/disease-prevention-information/serogroup-b-meningococcal-disease/outbreaks/). It is recognized that adults who receive successful vaccines help prevent the spread of contagious disease and ultimately protect those who cannot be immunized for health or other reasons. I regularly appreciate our volunteers when I am able to prescribe an FDA-approved vaccine to a private practice patient. It is truly rewarding to work together to help prevent disease.

 


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